D-Day honoured with wreath laying

Dignitaries took part in the wreath laying to commemorate D-Day. (RILEY FRIESEN/Morden Times)

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To commemorate the men and women who fought on the beaches during D-Day, a wreath-laying ceremony was held in the early morning on June 6th at the Confederation Park.
In remembrance of the battles 75 years ago, a short program was held and hosted by Ken Wiebe, a member of the Morden Legion, leading up to the laying of the wreath.
Wiebe gave a speech about the importance of the days spent taking the beaches and how those days were considered the “beginning of the end of the war.”
“We are living in a free country, and there’s a reason for that,” Wiebe said. “The battle of Normandy cost 5,000 Canadian lives. It was a fairly momentous day.”
The epitaph, which stands in the middle of the Confederation park, lists the names of soldiers who fought in both WW1 and WW2.
Wiebe said he wishes more of Canadian history, especially of the world wars, would be taught as a reminder of what had happened, because “when you forget the history of the world wars, you tend to repeat them.”
Wiebe also noted the news around the world currently is “pretty dire”. Wiebe said to remember the freedoms available in Canada “came at a price” during the world wars as some current events have mirrored the past.
“I think all memorials are important,” Wiebe said, as it is a reminder of how far the world has come and “what this country can be.”
Wiebe described a ceremony that was held in France to memorialize the 75th anniversary of D-Day, which hosted some Canadian WW2 veterans who “are now in their mid-nineties”. These same soldiers, Wiebe said would have been in their early to mid 20’s when the fighting on the beaches took place.
Wrapping up the ceremony in Morden, Deputy Mayor Nancy Penner laid the wreath in front of the epitaph.

Dignitaries took part in the wreath laying to commemorate D-Day. (RILEY FRIESEN/Morden Times)

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